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Conference Posters

The Development of Rhetoric 22-23 June 2008

Association for Rhetoric and Communication in SA, 5th African Symposium on Rhetoric, 3rd-5th July 2002

Association for Rhetoric and Communication in SA, 4th African Symposium on Rhetoric, 9-10 August 2000

Association for Rhetoric and Communication in SA, Third Symposium, 28-29 August 1998

Newsletter 1/2008

Greetings,

I hope this finds you well and that the turn of the year has been pleasant. I write this morning to remind everyone about the call for papers that has been issued by the National Communication Association (NCA).

Each year, ARCSA sponsors two panels at the NCA meeting in November. In 2008, the event will convene in San Diego, California. ARCSA's specific call is appended below. If you are interested, I encourage you to submit a proposal or paper. Submissions are handled through the NCA website (www.natcom.org).

With Warm Greetings,

Erik Doxtader

ARCSA CALL FOR 2008 Meeting of the National Communication Association

The Association for Rhetoric and Communication in Southern Africa (ARCSA), in collaboration with the Centre for Rhetoric Studies, Cape Town, invites paper proposals, full papers, and panel proposals. Broadly, the Association seeks submissions addressed to the history of rhetoric and/or contemporary topics in rhetorical theory, including interventions which extend and trouble the anchoring of rhetoric in philosophy, political theory, or theology. While encouraged, submissions need not be limited to the study of Southern Africa or Africa generally.

This year, the Association is particularly interested in receiving papers and proposals that reflect on the conventional and unconventional forms of 'rhetorical power' in African politics. Interpreted broadly, this thematic includes questions such as: In the wake of colonialism's devastation and brutal post-independence civil wars, how have various African nations struggled to rebuild political 'norms of rhetorical culture' and forums for collective political deliberation? Are there features of African politics that challenge or productively complicate taken for granted views about the theory and practice of rhetorical argumentation? How do historical and contemporary forms of African politics confirm and/or critique the premises of liberalist political theory? What are the rhetorical lessons of recent elections in Africa?

General inquiries or questions about potential proposals should be directed to Professor Erik Doxtader at the University of South Carolina (email: doxtader@gwm.sc.edu).

All submissions must be received by 13 February 2008 and should be submitted through the All Academic System on the NCA website (www.natcom.org).




7th Biennial African Symposium of Rhetoric, Cape Town, June 2007


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